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See also: sénile

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Old French senile, from Latin senīlis (of or pertaining to old age), from Latin senex (old man), from Gaulish and Proto-Indo-European *sénos (old).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

senile (comparative more senile, superlative most senile)

  1. Of, or relating to old age.
    • 2013 May-June, Charles T. Ambrose, “Alzheimer’s Disease”, in American Scientist, volume 101, number 3, page 200:
      Similar studies of rats have employed four different intracranial resorbable, slow sustained release systems— […]. Such a slow-release device containing angiogenic factors could be placed on the pia mater covering the cerebral cortex and tested in persons with senile dementia in long term studies.
  2. (often offensive) Exhibiting the deterioration in mind and body often accompanying old age; doddering.

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

NounEdit

senile (plural seniles)

  1. (dated, medicine) A person who is senile.
    • 1979, Oscar J. Kaplan, Psychopathology of Aging, page 54:
      Seniles differ markedly in their early adult intelligence level, and in their social, vocational, and educational histories.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

senile (masculine and feminine plural senili)

  1. senile

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

Old FrenchEdit

AdjectiveEdit

senile m (oblique and nominative feminine singular senile)

  1. relating to old age

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit