See also: sensā

IstriotEdit

EtymologyEdit

Probably ultimately from Latin absentia. Compare Venetian sensa, Dalmatian siansa, Italian senza.

AdverbEdit

sensa

  1. without

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From sēnsus

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sēnsa n pl (genitive sēnsōrum); second declension

  1. perceptions, ideas

DeclensionEdit

Second-declension noun (neuter), plural only.

Case Plural
Nominative sēnsa
Genitive sēnsōrum
Dative sēnsīs
Accusative sēnsa
Ablative sēnsīs
Vocative sēnsa

ParticipleEdit

sēnsa

  1. inflection of sēnsus:
    1. nominative/vocative feminine singular
    2. nominative/accusative/vocative neuter plural

ParticipleEdit

sēnsā

  1. ablative feminine singular of sēnsus

ReferencesEdit

  • sensa in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • sensa in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • sensa in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) to come within the sphere of the senses: sub sensum or sub oculos, sub aspectum cadere
    • (ambiguous) to be a man of taste: sensum, iudicium habere
    • (ambiguous) to express oneself in popular language: ad vulgarem sensum or ad communem opinionem orationem accommodare (Off. 2. 10. 35)
    • (ambiguous) to be quite insensible of all feelings to humanity: omnem humanitatis sensum amisisse
  • sensa in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[2], pre-publication website, 2005-2016

SwahiliEdit

NounEdit

sensa (n class, plural sensa)

  1. census

VenetianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Probably from Latin absentia. Compare Italian senza, Istriot sensa, Dalmatian siansa.

AdverbEdit

sensa

  1. without