shellac

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

shell +‎ lac, calque of French laque (lac) + en (in) + écailles (scales, shells)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

shellac (countable and uncountable, plural shellacs)

  1. A processed secretion of the lac insect, Coccus lacca; used in polishes, varnishes etc.
  2. (informal, US) A beating; a thrashing.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

shellac (third-person singular simple present shellacs, present participle shellacking, simple past and past participle shellacked)

  1. (transitive) To coat with shellac.
  2. (informal, US, transitive) To beat; to thrash.
  3. (informal, US, transitive) To inflict a heavy defeat upon.
    • 1987 George F. Will, The New Season: A Spectator's Guide to the 1988 Election (Simon and Schuster), p. 21:
      In 1964 Goldwater ran rambunctiously, flat-out against government. He got shellacked.
    • 1987 Tim McCarver and Ray Robinson, Oh, Baby, I Love It! (Villard Books), p. 220:
      In another the Mets were shellacked, 9-1, with a stray ninth-inning home run by Strawberry after two outs, preventing a shutout.

TranslationsEdit