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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

19th century US. Probably an alteration of British dialect scaddle (to run off in a fright), from the adjective scaddle (wild, timid, skittish), from Middle English scathel, skadylle (harmful, fierce, wild), perhaps of Scandinavian origin, from Old Norse *sköþull; or from Old English *scaþol, *sceaþol (see scathel); akin to Old Norse skaði (harm). Possibly related to the Greek σκέδασις (skédasis, scattering), σκεδασμός (skedasmós, dispersion). (US) Possibly related to scud or scat.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

skedaddle (third-person singular simple present skedaddles, present participle skedaddling, simple past and past participle skedaddled)

  1. (intransitive) To move or run away quickly.

SynonymsEdit

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See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • 1897, Hunter, Robert, and Charles Morris, editors, Universal Dictionary of the English Language, v4, p4291: "Etym. doubtful; perhaps allied to scud. To betake one's self hurriedly to flight; to run away as in a panic; to fly in terror. (A word of American origin.)"
  • Skedaddle” in Michael Quinion, World Wide Words[1], 7 February 2004.