See also: skuła and skúla

FaroeseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse skulu, from Proto-Germanic *skulaną.

VerbEdit

skula (third person singular past indicative skuldi, third person plural past indicative skuldu, supine skulað)

  1. shall, to be obliged

ConjugationEdit


GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

skula

  1. Romanization of 𐍃𐌺𐌿𐌻𐌰

Norwegian NynorskEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

skula (present tense skuler, past tense skulte, past participle skult, passive infinitive skulast, present participle skulande, imperative skul)

  1. to scowl; stare at someone or something with a look of displeasure or anger; to frown

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

skula (present tense skal, past tense skulle, past participle skula or skulla)
Before 1959: skula (present tense skal, past tense skulle, past participle skula)
Before 1938: skula (present tense skal, past tense skulde, past participle skula)

  1. form removed with the spelling reform of 1987; superseded by skulla

ReferencesEdit


Old SwedishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse skulu, from Proto-Germanic *skulaną.

VerbEdit

skula

  1. to shall, to be obliged

ConjugationEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Swedish: skola

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Cognate to older Danish skule (hide, take shelter). Probably a loan from Middle Low German schulen (to hide), compare Dutch schuilen (to take shelter).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

skula (present skular, preterite skulade, supine skulat, imperative skula)

  1. (Scania) to take shelter from the rain
    2013, Teresa Lindstedt, “Medeltiden - inte så trendig”, in Sydsvenskan[1]:
    Strax därefter kom regnet och skrymslen att skula i blev mest populära.
    Shortly thereafter, the rain came and the nooks to hide in became the most popular.

ConjugationEdit

ReferencesEdit