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EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

13th century. From Old French esclandre, from Ecclesiastical Latin scandalum (stumbling block, temptation), from Ancient Greek σκάνδαλον (skándalon, scandal).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈslɑːndə/, /ˈslandɚ/

NounEdit

slander (countable and uncountable, plural slanders)

  1. A false or unsupported, malicious statement (spoken, not written), especially one which is injurious to a person's reputation; the making of such a statement.

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VerbEdit

slander (third-person singular simple present slanders, present participle slandering, simple past and past participle slandered)

  1. To utter a slanderous statement; baselessly speak ill of.
    • 1601, Ben Jonson, Poetaster or The Arraignment: [] , London: Printed [by R. Bradock] for M[atthew] L[ownes] [] , published 1602, OCLC 316392309, Act III, scene iv:
      Tuc[ca]. [] Can thy Author doe it impudently enough? / Hiſt[rio]. O, I warrant you, Captaine: and ſpitefully inough too; he ha's one of the moſt ouerflowing villanous wits, in Rome. He will ſlander any man that breathes; If he diſguſt him. / Tucca. I'le know the poor, egregious, nitty Raſcall; and he haue ſuch commendable Qualities, I'le cheriſh him: []

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