EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

snark +‎ -y; 1906, as “irritable”, from snark (to snort), by onomatopoeia (1866). Compare Low German snarken (to snore), North Frisian snarke, Swedish snarka.[1] In the sense “sarcastic” popularized in the late 1990s.[2]

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

snarky (comparative snarkier, superlative snarkiest)

  1. (informal) Snide and sarcastic; usually out of irritation, often humorously.
  2. (obsolete) Irritable, irritated.
    Synonym: cranky
    • 1910, E. Nesbit, chapter 12, in The Magic City:
      'I hate you,' she said briefly, and Philip understood. 'I couldn't help it,' he said; 'I did want to do something by myself.' And Lucy understood. 'And besides,' he said, 'I was coming back for you. Don't be snarky about it, Lu.
    • 1918, C. J. Dennis, “Dad”, in Digger Smith:
      'E barks. "I'll do me work meself, yeh 'ear?" An' then 'e gits so snarky that I clear.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ snarky” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2020.
  2. ^ snarky_ADJ at Google Ngram Viewer

AnagramsEdit