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See also: Spat, spaț, spať, spát, spät, şpat, and ṣpät

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Old English spittan, spætan.

VerbEdit

spat

  1. simple past tense and past participle of spit
    There was no sink in the room so we spat out the window.
    If I had known you had a spittoon in the corner I would never have spat on the floor.

Etymology 2Edit

Of uncertain origin; perhaps related to spit.

NounEdit

spat (uncountable)

  1. The spawn of shellfish, especially oysters and similar molluscs.
    • 2005, TVR Pillay & MN Kutty, Aquaculture: Principles and practices, p. 525:
      As spat-fall often occurs in areas away from environments suitable for oyster growing, the collection, transport and sale of oyster spat has developed into a separate industry.
  2. A juvenile shellfish which has attached to a hard surface.
    • 2011, The Pearl Oyster[1], page 256:
      Conditions in pearl oyster hatcheries are optimized for growth and survival of spat.
    • 1988, Bivalve Mollusc Culture Research in Thailand[2], page 28:
      If the spat are allowed to remain attached to the tank bottom for more than two days, they are difficult to remove without damage to the shell.
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

VerbEdit

spat (third-person singular simple present spats, present participle spatting, simple past and past participle spatted)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To spawn. Used of shellfish as above.

Etymology 3Edit

Shortening of spatterdash, from spatter + dash. 1779.

 
A felt spat
 
Australian 1970s Holden Kingswood with spats

NounEdit

spat (plural spats)

  1. A covering or decorative covering worn over a shoe.
  2. (automotive) (UK, Australia) A piece of bodywork that covers the upper portions of the rear tyres of a car.
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit
See alsoEdit

Etymology 4Edit

1804. American English, unknown origin.

NounEdit

spat (plural spats)

  1. a brief argument, falling out, quarrel
    • 2017 January 14, “Some Thais worry that a lasting power struggle is brewing. Others see a minor spat over language, which will quickly be forgotten.”, in The Economist[3]:
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

spat (third-person singular simple present spats, present participle spatting, simple past and past participle spatted)

  1. to quarrel or argue briefly
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Smart to this entry?)
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 5Edit

Attested from 1823.

NounEdit

spat (plural spats)

  1. A light blow with something flat.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

spat (third-person singular simple present spats, present participle spatting, simple past and past participle spatted)

  1. (transitive and intransitive) To strike with a spattering sound.
    • 1922, B. M. Bower, The Trail of the White Mule, ch. 3:
      He felt the wind of a second bullet that spatted against a boulder near Barney.
    • 2007, Nolan Clay, "Co-workers testify about Kelsey's mother," Daily Oklahoman, 13 July, (retrieved 25 Aug. 2009):
      "She mentioned she had spatted Kelsey on her diaper with a hairbrush," said Mildred Johnson, a co-worker.
  2. (US, dialect) To slap, as with the open hand; to clap together, as the hands.
    • Sylvester Judd
      Little Isabel leaped up and down, spatting her hands.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 6Edit

Latin spatium (space)

NounEdit

spat (plural spats)

  1. An obsolete unit of distance in astronomy (symbol S), equal to one billion kilometres.

AnagramsEdit


AmisEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Austronesian *Səpat.

NumeralEdit

spat

  1. (cardinal) four

DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Low German spat. Compare German Spat and Swedish spatt.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

spat c (singular definite spatten, not used in plural form)

  1. spavin (disease of horses characterized by a bony swelling developed on the hock as the result of inflammation of the bones)
  2. få spat – get annoyed or angry

Derived termsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

spat m (plural spatten, diminutive spatje n)

  1. spot, speckle, stain

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

spat

  1. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of spatten
  2. imperative of spatten

AnagramsEdit


Lower SorbianEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

spat

  1. supine of spaś

Serbo-CroatianEdit

VerbEdit

spat

  1. Short form of spavati: "Cili Trogir ide spat" = "Cijeli Trogir ide spati" = "The whole City of Trogir goes to sleep"

TarokoEdit