Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin, a spy, explorer, investigator.

NounEdit

speculator ‎(plural speculators)

  1. One who speculates; an observer; a contemplator.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir Thomas Browne to this entry?)
  2. One who forms theories; a theorist.
    • 1666, Joseph Glanvill, Philosophical Considerations concerning Witches and Witchcraft
      [] in things of Fact, the People are as much to be believed, as the most subtle Philosophers and Speculators, since here sense is the Judge.
    • 1848, Thomas Babington Macaulay, The History of England from the Accession of James the Second
      For, in the earlier part of the seventeenth century, a speculator who had dared to affirm that the human soul is by its nature mortal, and does, in the great majority of cases, actually die with the body, would have been burned alive in Smithfield.
  3. (business, finance) One who speculates; as in investing, one who is willing to take volatile risks upon invested principle for the potential of substantial returns.

See alsoEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

speculātor m ‎(genitive speculātōris); third declension

  1. spy, scout
  2. explorer
  3. investigator

InflectionEdit

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative speculātor speculātōrēs
genitive speculātōris speculātōrum
dative speculātōrī speculātōribus
accusative speculātōrem speculātōrēs
ablative speculātōre speculātōribus
vocative speculātor speculātōrēs

DescendantsEdit

VerbEdit

speculātor

  1. second-person singular future active imperative of speculor
  2. third-person singular future active imperative of speculor

ReferencesEdit