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EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Scots speill (to climb), of obscure origin. From or akin to Old Scots spelare (acrobat, tumbler). Probably from Middle Dutch spelen (to play, walk a tight rope, do gymnastic tricks, juggle, perform as an actor or clown), see spiel. Alternately, representing a continuation of Old English spilian (to play).

VerbEdit

speel (third-person singular simple present speels, present participle speeling, simple past and past participle speeled)

  1. (dialect, Scottish and Northern English) To climb.
    • 1832 March 5, Memoirs of a Paisley Baillie, The Day: A Journal of Literature, Fine Arts, Fashions, &c., Glasgow, page 218,
      This I thocht at the time when he was speeling up the ladder before me in the Hie Kirk steeple ; but good breeding, at that particular time, keeped me from taking ony correck view of how things stood in that quarter.
    • 1841, Humorous Traits of an Old Highland Gentleman, Chambers′ Edinburgh Journal, Volume 9, Numbers 317-318, page 94,
      They were catched speeling up the lamp-posts and taking oot the cruizes and drinking the ulye, wick and a′.
    • 1860, Hugh MacDonald, Days at the Coast: A Series of Sketches Descriptive of the Firth of Clyde, Glasgow, page 255,
      There is a comfortable inn at this picturesque spot, where those who purpose speeling the lofty Ben generally prepare for their arduous undertaking.

Etymology 2Edit

From English dialectal speel (talk; lingo; patter), short for bonspiel. Related to spiel.

VerbEdit

speel (third-person singular simple present speels, present participle speeling, simple past and past participle speeled)

  1. To talk at length, to spiel.
    • 1972, Sven Berlin, Pride of the Peacock: The Evolution of an Artist, page 91,
      Old Saxon, who was so sweet and gentle despite his long years on the halls, smiled at me and suggested I should do some speeling. Yedo gave me a megaphone. I held it to my mouth but there was silence.
    • 1973, Irene Baird, Waste Heritage, Macmillan of Canada, page 262,
      “I must close now or I shall go on speeling all night. []

Etymology 3Edit

VerbEdit

speel (third-person singular simple present speels, present participle speeling, simple past and past participle speeled)

  1. (dialect, Australia) To run.

Etymology 4Edit

Probably from Afrikaans [Term?]. Compare Middle English spel (a story; tale; narrative). More at spell.

NounEdit

speel (plural speels)

  1. (chiefly South Africa) A story; a spiel.

Etymology 5Edit

Possibly related to spile

NounEdit

speel (plural speels)

  1. (dialect) A splinter; a strip of wood or metal.

Etymology 6Edit

Perhaps continuing Middle English spilen (to revel, play), from Old English spilian (to revel, play), from Proto-Germanic *spilōną. Cognate with Dutch spelen (to play), German spielen (to play), Luxembourgish spillen (to play), Icelandic spila (to play), Faroese spæla (to play), Swedish spela (to play), Danish spille (to play), Norwegian spille (to play).

VerbEdit

speel (third-person singular simple present speels, present participle speeling, simple past and past participle speeled)

  1. (dialectal, rural, Northern England, Scotland) To lake, play, sport, take amusement.
    To speel ba'.
Derived termsEdit
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 7Edit

From Proto-Germanic *spilą (dance, game).

NounEdit

speel (plural speels)

  1. (dialectal, rural, Northern England, Scotland) A game.
    To play a good speel.
ReferencesEdit

AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

Dutch spelen

VerbEdit

speel (present speel, present participle spelende, past participle gespeel)

  1. to play

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

speel

  1. first-person singular present indicative of spelen
  2. imperative of spelen

AnagramsEdit