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See also: špina and špína

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin spīna

NounEdit

spina (plural spinae)

  1. A spine; the backbone.
  2. One of the quills of a spinet.
  3. (historical) A barrier dividing the Ancient Roman hippodrome longitudinally.

AnagramsEdit


FaroeseEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

spina f (genitive singular spinu, uncountable)

  1. sperm

DeclensionEdit

Declension of spina (singular only)
f1s singular
indefinite definite
nominative spina spinan
accusative spinu spinuna
dative spinu spinuni
genitive spinu spinunnar

SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin spīna, from Proto-Italic *speinā, from Proto-Indo-European *spey- (sharp point).

NounEdit

spina f (plural spine)

  1. thorn
  2. spine, prickle
  3. plug (electrical)
  4. bone (of fish)
  5. bunghole

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Italic *speinā, from Proto-Indo-European *spey- (sharp point). Cognates include Latvian spina and Russian спина (spina).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

spīna f (genitive spīnae); first declension

  1. a thorny tree or shrub, such as whitethorn, hawthorn, or blackthorn
  2. (transferred sense) thorn, spine, prickle
  3. A low wall along the centre of a circus (race course)
  4. (in the plural) difficulties

DeclensionEdit

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative spīna spīnae
Genitive spīnae spīnārum
Dative spīnae spīnīs
Accusative spīnam spīnās
Ablative spīnā spīnīs
Vocative spīna spīnae

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • spina in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • spina in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • spina in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • spina in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • subtleties of logic; dilemmas: disserendi spinae (Fin. 4. 28. 79)
    • minute, captious subdivisions and definitions: spinae partiendi et definiendi (Tusc. 5. 8. 22)
  • spina in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • spina in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly
  • spina in Richard Stillwell et al., editor (1976) The Princeton Encyclopedia of Classical Sites, Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press
  • De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, page 580

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

spina

  1. Alternative form of spyne

PolishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From spinać.

NounEdit

spina f

  1. (slang) sudden jitters or anxiety
  2. (dated) Augmentative of spinka; fastener
DeclensionEdit

VerbEdit

spina

  1. third-person singular present of spinać

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

spina f

  1. (obsolete) spine, vertebral column
DeclensionEdit
SynonymsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • spina in Polish dictionaries at PWN