squelch

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

Unknown. Perhaps a blend of squash +‎ quell +‎ quench. Compare also English squolsh, English squoosh.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

squelch (third-person singular simple present squelches, present participle squelching, simple past and past participle squelched)

  1. (transitive, US) To halt, stop, eliminate, stamp out, or put down, often suddenly or by force.
    Synonym: quash
    Even the king's announcement could not squelch the rumors.
  2. (transitive, radio technology) To suppress the unwanted hiss or static between received transmissions by adjusting a threshold level for signal strength.
  3. (intransitive, Britain) To make a sucking, splashing noise as when walking on muddy ground.
    The mud squelched underfoot; it had been raining all night.
  4. (intransitive, Britain) To walk or step through a substance such as mud.
    The mud was thick and sticky underfoot, but we squelched through it nonetheless.

TranslationsEdit

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NounEdit

squelch (countable and uncountable, plural squelches)

  1. (countable) A squelching sound.
  2. (radio technology) The suppression of the unwanted hiss or static between received transmissions by adjusting the gain of the receiver.
  3. (countable, dated) A heavy blow or fall.
  4. (countable, music) A kind of electronic beat or sound mainly used in acid house and related music genres.
    • 1998, Colin Larkin, The Virgin Encyclopedia of Dance Music (page 91)
      Through a process of experimentation the 'acid squelch' sound came forth, which was recorded and passed on to DJ Ron Hardy to play at his Warehouse club.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit