EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈsteɪ.bəɫ/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪbəl

Etymology 1Edit

 
The interior of a horse stable (sense 1)

From Middle English stable, borrowed from Anglo-Norman stable and Old French estable, from Latin stabulum (stall, stand).

NounEdit

stable (plural stables)

  1. A building, wing or dependency set apart and adapted for lodging and feeding (and training) animals with hoofs, especially horses.
    There were stalls for fourteen horses in the squire's stables.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 5, in The Celebrity:
      We made an odd party before the arrival of the Ten, particularly when the Celebrity dropped in for lunch or dinner. He could not be induced to remain permanently at Mohair because Miss Trevor was at Asquith, but he appropriated a Hempstead cart from the Mohair stables and made the trip sometimes twice in a day.
  2. (metonymically) All the racehorses of a particular stable, i.e. belonging to a given owner.
  3. (Scotland) A set of advocates; a barristers' chambers.
  4. (sumo) An organization of sumo wrestlers who live and train together.
    Synonym: heya
  5. A group of prostitutes managed by one pimp.
    Synonym: string
    • 2013, Noble Dee, Pimp: Reflection of My Life (page 167)
      My pimp vision enabled me to see that no hoe in my stable would be more worthy of the game than my young turnout red-bones.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

stable (third-person singular simple present stables, present participle stabling, simple past and past participle stabled)

  1. (transitive) to put or keep (an animal) in a stable.
  2. (intransitive) to dwell in a stable.
  3. (rail transport, transitive) to park (a rail vehicle).
    • 1960 July, Trains Illustrated, page 385, photo caption:
      S.R. Pacific No. 34010 Sidmouth leaves Wembley Central to stable the stock of its excursion from the S.R. at North Wembley; the train was run in connection with a Wembley football event on April 30, 1960.
    • 2020 April 22, “Fleet News: Passenger operators put parts of fleet into warm storage...”, in Rail, page 25:
      Great Western Railway has placed its Class 143 Pacer fleet into warm storage, with the majority stabled at Exeter.
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

 
Stable (sense 1) scales

From Middle English stable, from Anglo-Norman stable, stabel, from Latin stabilis (firm, steadfast) (itself from stare (stand) + -abilis (able)).

AdjectiveEdit

stable (comparative more stable, superlative most stable)

  1. Relatively unchanging, permanent; firmly fixed or established; consistent; not easily moved, altered, or destroyed.
    He was in a stable relationship.
    a stable government
    • a. 1729, John Rogers, The Greatness of the Gospel Salvation
      In this region of chance, [] where nothing ws stable.
  2. (computing) Of software: established to be relatively free of bugs, as opposed to a beta version.
    You should download the 1.9 version of that video editing software: it is the latest stable version. The newer beta version has some bugs.
  3. (computer science, of a sorting algorithm) That maintains the relative order of items that compare as equal.
SynonymsEdit
AntonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin stabilis. Replaced Middle French, Old French estable, an earlier borrowing from the same Latin source.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

stable (plural stables)

  1. stable (relatively unchanging)

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Anglo-Norman stable, from Vulgar Latin *stabula, probably a collective plural of Latin stabulum (dwelling; stable).

NounEdit

stable (plural stables or stablen)

  1. stable (building for horses)
    • c. 1400, Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales, General Prologue, lines 28-29:
      The chambres and the stables weren wyde, / And wel we weren esed atte beste;
      The rooms and stables spacious were and wide, / And well we there were eased, and of the best.
Alternative formsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • English: stable
  • Scots: stable
  • Middle Irish: stábla
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Anglo-Norman stable, stabel, from Latin stabilis (firm, steadfast).

AdjectiveEdit

stable (comparative stabler or stablere or stablour)

  1. stable (relatively unchanging)
Alternative formsEdit
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

stable (plural stables)

  1. Alternative form of stablie

Etymology 4Edit

NounEdit

stable (plural stables)

  1. Alternative form of stapel

Etymology 5Edit

VerbEdit

stable (third-person singular simple present stableth, present participle stablynge, first-/third-person singular past indicative and past participle stabled)

  1. Alternative form of stablen (to establish)

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the noun stabel

VerbEdit

stable (imperative stabl or stable, present tense stabler, passive stables, simple past and past participle stabla or stablet, present participle stablende)

  1. to stack, pile

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the noun stabel

VerbEdit

stable (present tense stablar, past tense stabla, past participle stabla, passive infinitive stablast, present participle stablande, imperative stabl)

  1. to stack, pile

Alternative formsEdit

ReferencesEdit