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See also: stáid

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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

An adjective use of stayed, the past participle of stay.[1]

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

staid (comparative staider, superlative staidest)

  1. Not capricious or impulsive; sedate, serious, sober.
    Synonyms: composed, dignified, regular, steady
    Antonyms: fanciful, unpredictable, volatile, wild
  2. (rare) Always fixed in the same location; stationary.

TranslationsEdit

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VerbEdit

staid

  1. Obsolete spelling of stayed
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, “Which Consists of Visiting”, in The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling. In Six Volumes, volume V, London: Printed by A[ndrew] Millar, [], OCLC 928184292, book XIII (Containing the Space of Twelve Days), page 29:
      The Company had now ſtaid ſo long, that Mrs. Fitzpatrick plainly perceived they all deſigned to ſtay out each other. She therefore reſolved to rid herſelf of Jones, he being the Viſitant, to whom ſhe thought the leaſt Ceremony was due.
    • 1813 January 27, [Jane Austen], chapter XIX, in Pride and Prejudice: A Novel. In Three Volumes, volume III, London: Printed [by George Sidney] for T[homas] Egerton, [], OCLC 38659585, page 320:
      Though Darcy could never receive him at Pemberley, yet, for Elizabeth's sake, he assisted him farther in his profession. Lydia was occasionally a visitor there, when her husband was gone to enjoy himself in London or Bath; and with the Bingleys they both of them frequently staid so long, that even Bingley's good humour was overcome, and he proceeded so far as to talk of giving them a hint to be gone.

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


IrishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

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NounEdit

staid f (genitive singular staide, nominative plural staideanna)

  1. stadium
  2. furlong
DeclensionEdit
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

NounEdit

staid f (genitive singular staide, nominative plural staideanna)

  1. state, condition
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit