statua

See also: stàtua

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin statua.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈstatʃʊə/, /ˈstatjʊə/

NounEdit

statua ‎(plural statuas)

  1. (now rare, archaic) A statue. [from 15th c.]

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

statua

  1. third-person singular past historic of statuer

ItalianEdit

statua

EtymologyEdit

From Latin statua

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

statua f ‎(plural statue)

  1. statue

HyponymsEdit

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

statua Liviae Drusillae (statue of Livia Drusilla)

EtymologyEdit

From statuō ‎(I erect, set up, cause to stand).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

statua f ‎(genitive statuae); first declension

  1. a statue, especially one made of metal

InflectionEdit

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative statua statuae
genitive statuae statuārum
dative statuae statuīs
accusative statuam statuās
ablative statuā statuīs
vocative statua statuae

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • statua” in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879.
  • statua” in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to set up a statue in some one's honour: statuam alicui ponere, constituere
    • to put an inscription on statues: statuas inscribere (Verr. 2. 69. 167)

PolishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin statua

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈstatua], colloquially: [staˈtua]

NounEdit

statua f

  1. statue

DeclensionEdit

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