Alternative formsEdit


From Middle English stede, stedi, stidiʒ, from Old English stæþþiġ, from stæþ ‎(stead, bank), equivalent to stathe +‎ -y or stead +‎ -y. Cognate with Danish stedig, stadig, steeg, Swedish stadig, Icelandic stöðugur, Middle Dutch stedigh, German stätig, stetig.



steady ‎(comparative steadier, superlative steadiest)

  1. Firm in standing or position; not tottering or shaking; fixed; firm.
    Hold the ladder steady while I go up.
    • Sir Philip Sidney (1554-1586)
      Their feet steady, their hands diligent, their eyes watchful, and their hearts resolute.
    • 1879, Richard Jefferies, The Amateur Poacher, chapter1:
      But then I had the flintlock by me for protection. ¶ There were giants in the days when that gun was made; for surely no modern mortal could have held that mass of metal steady to his shoulder. The linen-press and a chest on the top of it formed, however, a very good gun-carriage; and, thus mounted, aim could be taken out of the window, [].
    • 1915, Emerson Hough, The Purchase Price, chapterI:
      Captain Edward Carlisle, soldier as he was, martinet as he was, felt a curious sensation of helplessness seize upon him as he met her steady gaze, her alluring smile ; he could not tell what this prisoner might do.
  2. Constant in feeling, purpose, or pursuit; not fickle, changeable, or wavering; not easily moved or persuaded to alter a purpose; resolute.
    a man steady in his principles, in his purpose, or in the pursuit of an object
  3. Smooth and not bumpy or with obstructions.
    a steady ride
  4. Regular and even.
    the steady course of the Sun;  a steady breeze of wind
  5. Slow.


Derived termsEdit



steady ‎(third-person singular simple present steadies, present participle steadying, simple past and past participle steadied)

  1. To stabilize something; to prevent from shaking.



steady ‎(plural steadies)

  1. (informal) A regular customer.
    • 2013, Sheila Foster, Soho Whore
      Some of my steadies wanted me to go out with them on a date. Occasionally I let one of them take me to a film or out for a meal.

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