stehlen

GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German stelan, from Proto-Germanic *stelaną. Compare Low German stehlen, Dutch stelen, English steal, Danish stjæle.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈʃteːlən/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: steh‧len
  • Homophone: Stelen

VerbEdit

stehlen (class 4 strong, third-person singular simple present stiehlt, past tense stahl, past participle gestohlen, auxiliary haben)

  1. (transitive or intransitive) to steal
  2. (reflexive) to skulk, to move secretly

Usage notesEdit

  • The person from whom the thing is stolen is given in the dative case. Thus, Er hat mir ein Buch gestohlen means: “He stole a book from me.” This is quite contrary to English usage, where “He stole me a book” would be the equivalent of German: Er hat ein Buch für mich gestohlen. The person for whom the thing is stolen must be expressed as an object of "für".
  • An exception to this, however, is a reflexive dative, which will have the same sense as in English: Er hat sich ein Buch gestohlen means: “He stole himself a book.” This exception is implied by logic, since one cannot steal from oneself.

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Low GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Saxon stelan, from Proto-Germanic *stelaną.

VerbEdit

stehlen (third-person singular simple present stehlt, past tense stohl, past participle stahlen, auxiliary verb hebben)

  1. (transitive or intransitive) to steal
  2. (reflexive) to skulk, to move secretly

Usage notesEdit

As in High German, the person from whom the thing is stolen is given in the oblique case. Thus, He hett mi en Book stahlen means: “He stole a book from me.” This is quite contrary to English usage, where “He stole me a book” would be the equivalent of Low German: He hett en Book för mi stahlen.

ConjugationEdit

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