straightforward

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From straight +‎ forward.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

straightforward (comparative more straightforward, superlative most straightforward)

  1. proceeding in a straight course or manner; not deviating
  2. easy, simple, uncomplicated, without difficulty
    • 1960 September, P. Ransome-Wallis, “Modern motive power of the German Federal Railway: Part One”, in Trains Illustrated, page 553:
      For the most part they are of straightforward design and the largest group is the ex-Prussian "T16" Class 0-10-0 of Type "94", [...].
    • #*
      15 October 2013, Daniel Taylor, “Steven Gerrard goal against Poland ensures England will go to World Cup”, in The Guardian[1]:
      Poland played with great energy, quick to the ball, strong in the challenge, and projecting the clear sense they had absolutely no intention whatsoever of making this a straightforward night.
  3. (figuratively) direct; forthright; frank; sincere
    • 1992, George J. Church, "Why Voters Don't Trust Clinton," Time, 20 Apr, p. 38,
      A great deal of the uneasiness about Clinton reflects his propensity to dance away from straightforward yes or no answers to any character question.

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AdverbEdit

straightforward (comparative more straightforward, superlative most straightforward)

  1. In a straightforward manner; straightforwards; straightforwardly.

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