strumpet

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English strumpet, strompet, strumpett. Further origin uncertain; possibly from Middle Dutch strompen (to stalk) or strompe (stocking); or Late Latin stuprum (violation) or stuprare (to violate).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈstɹʌm.pɪt/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌmpɪt

NounEdit

strumpet (plural strumpets)

  1. A female prostitute
  2. A woman who is very sexually active.
  3. A female adulterer.
  4. A mistress.
  5. (derogatory) A trollop; a whore.
    • 1638, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], “Symptomes of Iealousie, Fear, Sorrow, Suspition, Strange Actions, Gestures, Outrages, Locking Up, Oathes, Trials, Lawes, &c.”, in The Anatomy of Melancholy. [], 5th edition, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed [by Robert Young, Miles Flesher, and Leonard Lichfield and William Turner] for Henry Cripps, OCLC 932915040, partition 3, section 3, member 2, subsection 1, page 610:
      He cals her on a ſudden, all to naught; ſhe is a ſtrumpet, a light huswife, a bitch, an arrant whore.
    • 1900, Mark Twain, The Battle Hymn of the Republic, Updated
      We have legalized the strumpet and are guarding her retreat; Greed is seeking out commercial souls before his judgement seat; O, be swift, ye clods, to answer him! be jubilant my feet! Our god is marching on!
    • 1936, Anthony Bertram, Like the Phoenix:
      However, terrible as it may seem to the tall maiden sisters of J.P.'s in Queen Anne houses with walled vegetable gardens, this courtesan, strumpet, harlot, whore, punk, fille de joie, street-walker, this trollop, this trull, this baggage, this hussy, this drab, skit, rig, quean, mopsy, demirep, demimondaine, this wanton, this fornicatress, this doxy, this concubine, this frail sister, this poor Queenie--did actually solicit me, did actually say 'coming home to-night, dearie' and my soul was not blasted enough to call a policeman.

SynonymsEdit

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TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

strumpet (third-person singular simple present strumpets, present participle strumpeting, simple past and past participle strumpeted)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To debauch.
    • 1591, William Shakespeare, The Comedy of Errors, II. ii. 153:
      My blood is mingled with the crime of lust; / For if we two be one, and thou play false, / I do digest the poison of thy flesh, / Being strumpeted by thy contagion.
  2. (obsolete, transitive) To dishonour with the reputation of being a strumpet; to belie; to slander.

AnagramsEdit