substantive

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English substantif, from Old French substantif.

PronunciationEdit

  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈsʌbstəntɪv/, /səbˈstæntɪv/
  • (file)
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

substantive (comparative more substantive, superlative most substantive)

  1. of the essence or essential element of a thing; as, "substantive information"
    • 2012 October 6, “The first presidential debate: Back in the centre, back in the game”, in The Economist[1]:
      In one sense the first debate achieved the worst of all worlds: it managed to be technical, even dull, without being substantive or especially honest.
    Synonyms: essential, in essence
  2. having substance; enduring; solid; firm; substantial
    • 1836 [1829], William Hazlitt, “Definition of wit”, in Literary Remains of the Late William Hazlitt[2], page 19:
      Once more then, strength and magnitude are qualities which impress the imagination in a powerful and substantive manner;
    Synonyms: meaty, substantial
    Antonym: superficial
  3. (chemistry) of a dye that does not need the use of a mordant to be made fast to that which is being dyed
    Antonym: adjective
  4. Depending on itself; independent.
    • 1765 [1627], Francis Bacon, “New Atlantis”, in The Works of Francis Bacon[3], page 356:
      He therefore taking into consideration, how sufficient and substantive this land was to maintain itself without any aid at all of the foreigner,
  5. (grammar) Of or pertaining to a substantive.
    Synonym: substantival
  6. (military, of a rank or appointment) actually and legally held, as distinct from an acting, temporary or honorary rank or appointment

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

substantive (plural substantives)

  1. (grammar) Clipping of noun substantive. [from 16th c.]
    Synonyms: (sensu stricto) noun, noun substantive
    Hypernym: (sensu lato) noun
  2. Part of a text that carries the meaning, such as words and their ordering.
    Coordinate term: accidental

Alternative formsEdit

  • subst. (abbreviation used in lexicography and grammar)

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

substantive (third-person singular simple present substantives, present participle substantiving, simple past and past participle substantived)

  1. (grammar, very rare) to make a word belonging to another part of speech into a substantive (that is, a noun) or use it as a noun
    Synonyms: substantivize, nominalize

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

substantive

  1. feminine singular of substantif

LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

substantīve

  1. vocative masculine singular of substantīvus

PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

substantive

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of substantivar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of substantivar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of substantivar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of substantivar

RomanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

substantive

  1. plural of substantiv

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

substantive

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of substantivar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of substantivar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of substantivar.
  4. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of substantivar.