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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin succedere, to succeed in

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

successive (not comparable)

  1. Coming one after the other in a series.
    They had won the title for five successive years.
    • 2011 November 5, Phil Dawkes, “QPR 2 - 3 Man City”, in BBC Sport[1]:
      Mancini's men were far from their best but dug in to earn a 10th win in 11 league games and an eighth successive victory in all competitions to maintain their five-point lead at the top of the table.
  2. Of, or relating to a succession; hereditary.
    a successive title; a successive empire

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

FrenchEdit

AdjectiveEdit

successive

  1. feminine singular of successif

ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

successive

  1. feminine singular of successivo

LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

successīve

  1. vocative masculine singular of successīvus

ReferencesEdit

  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “successive”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre

SwedishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

successive

  1. absolute definite natural masculine form of successiv.