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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French suite. See also the doublet suit.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • IPA(key): /swiːt/
  • Rhymes: -iːt
  • Homophone: sweet
  • Hyphenation: suite

NounEdit

suite (plural suites)

  1. A retinue or company of attendants, as of a distinguished personage
    the ambassador's suite
  2. A connected series or succession of objects; a number of things used or classed together
    a suite of rooms
    a suite of minerals
    • 1992, Rudolf M[athias] Schuster, The Hepaticae and Anthocerotae of North America: East of the Hundredth Meridian, volume V, New York, N.Y.: Columbia University Press, →ISBN, page vii:
      Secondly, I continue to base my concepts on intensive study of a limited suite of collections, rather than superficial study of every packet that comes to hand.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 1, in The China Governess[1]:
      The huge square box, parquet-floored and high-ceilinged, had been arranged to display a suite of bedroom furniture designed and made in the halcyon days of the last quarter of the nineteenth century, […].
  3. A group of connected rooms, usually separable from other rooms by means of access.
    The Presidential suite is well appointed and allows for good security.
  4. (music) A musical form, popular before the time of the sonata, consisting of a string or series of pieces all in the same key, mostly in various dance rhythms, with sometimes an elaborate prelude.
  5. (music) An excerpt of instrumental music from a larger work that contains other elements besides the music; for example, the Nutcracker Suite is the music (but not the dancing) from the ballet The Nutcracker, and the Carmen Suite is the instrumental music (but not the singing and dancing) from the opera Carmen.
  6. (computing) A group of related computer programs distributed together.

HyponymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French suite.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

suite f (plural suites)

  1. suite (group of interconnected rooms)
  2. (music) suite (music piece)

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French suite, from earlier siute, from Vulgar Latin *sequita, (instead of classical secūta), as the feminine past participle of *sequere, from Latin sequor, sequi.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

suite f (plural suites)

  1. result
  2. sequel
  3. next step, next steps, that which follows, remainder, rest
  4. (poker) straight
  5. (mathematics) sequence
  6. suite (group of connected rooms)

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

suite

  1. fixed, secured
  2. mounted
  3. fast
  4. located

SynonymsEdit

NounEdit

suite

  1. genitive singular of suí

ParticipleEdit

suite

  1. past participle of suigh

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
suite shuite
after an, tsuite
not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

LatinEdit

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

suite

  1. Alternative form of sute

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French suite.

NounEdit

suite m (definite singular suiten, indefinite plural suiter, definite plural suitene)

  1. a suite (set of rooms)
  2. a suite (music)
  3. a suite (group of people in attendance)

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French suite.

NounEdit

suite m (definite singular suiten, indefinite plural suitar, definite plural suitane)

  1. a suite (set of rooms)
  2. a suite (music)
  3. a suite (group of people in attendance)

ReferencesEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From metathesis of earlier siute, sieute from Vulgar Latin *sequita, (instead of classical secūta), as the feminine past participle of *sequere, from Latin sequor, sequi.

NounEdit

suite f (oblique plural suites, nominative singular suite, nominative plural suites)

  1. pursuit (act of pursuing)

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: suit
  • French: suite

ReferencesEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French suite.

NounEdit

suite f (plural suites)

  1. suite (rooms, hotel)