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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English sweltren, swaltren, frequentative form of Middle English swelten (to die; faint), from Old English sweltan (to die), from Proto-Germanic *sweltaną (to die), from Proto-Indo-European *swel- (to smolder; burn), equivalent to swelt +‎ -er (frequentative suffix). More at swelt.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈswɛl.tə/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈswɛl.tɚ/
  • (file)
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  • Rhymes: -ɛltə(r)

VerbEdit

swelter (third-person singular simple present swelters, present participle sweltering, simple past and past participle sweltered)

  1. (intransitive) To suffer terribly from intense heat.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Samuel Taylor Coleridge to this entry?)
  2. (intransitive) To perspire greatly from heat.
  3. (transitive) To cause to faint, to overpower, as with heat.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

swelter (plural swelters)

  1. Intense heat.
    The summer swelter did not relent until late in September, most years.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit