syllabus

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Medieval Latin syllabus (list), which arose as a misprint, its accusative plural syllabos appearing in place of sittybas in a 1470s edition of Cicero's “Ad Atticum” IV.5 and 8.[1] The corrupt form was influenced by the stem of Ancient Greek συλλαμβάνω (sullambánō, put together), the source of σῠλλᾰβή (sullabḗ, syllable); the true etymon is σιττύβα (sittúba, parchment label, table of contents) of unknown origin.[2]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

syllabus (plural syllabi or syllabuses)

  1. (education) A summary of topics which will be covered during an academic course, or a text or lecture.
  2. (law) The headnote of a reported case; the brief statement of the points of law determined prefixed to a reported case.

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

syllabus m (genitive syllabī); second declension

  1. (Medieval Latin, New Latin) list, register, syllabus

DeclensionEdit

Second-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative syllabus syllabī
Genitive syllabī syllabōrum
Dative syllabō syllabīs
Accusative syllabum syllabōs
Ablative syllabō syllabīs
Vocative syllabe syllabī

ReferencesEdit