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EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English targe, either:

or

both ultimately from Old Norse targa (round shield) from Proto-Germanic *targǭ (edge), from Proto-Indo-European *derǵʰ- (fenced lot). Akin to Old High German zarga (side wall, rim) (German Zarge (border, frame)). However, the soft -g- seems to indicate a French origin.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

targe (plural targes)

  1. (archaic) A small shield
    • 1819, Walter Scott, Ivanhoe
      The Jester wore his usual fantastic habit, but late accidents had led him to adopt a good cutting falchion, instead of his wooden sword, with a targe to match it.
  2. (archaic) A tassel or pendant

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch targe. Spelling variants indicate that the Middle Dutch word derived from or was influenced by Old or Middle French.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈtɑr.ʒə/
  • Hyphenation: tar‧ge

NounEdit

targe f (plural targes)

  1. (historical, dated) A targe (concave, round or variously shaped shield).

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French targe "round shield, targe" from Old French targe "buckler", from Frankish *targa (buckler), probably from Old Norse targa (small round shield) (whence also Old English targe, targa (shield)) from Proto-Germanic *targǭ (edge), from Proto-Indo-European *dArg'h- (fenced lot). Akin to Old High German zarga (side wall, rim) (German Zarge (frame)).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

targe f (plural targes)

  1. a targe, buckler

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

NounEdit

targe f (plural targes)

  1. targe