Open main menu

Wiktionary β

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English targe, either:

or

both ultimately from Old Norse targa (round shield) from Proto-Germanic *targǭ (edge), from Proto-Indo-European *derǵʰ- (fenced lot). Akin to Old High German zarga (side wall, rim) (German Zarge (border, frame)). However, the soft -g- seems to indicate a French origin.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

targe (plural targes)

  1. (archaic) A small shield.
    • 1819, Walter Scott, Ivanhoe
      The Jester wore his usual fantastic habit, but late accidents had led him to adopt a good cutting falchion, instead of his wooden sword, with a targe to match it.

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French targe "round shield, targe" from Old French targe "buckler", from Frankish *targa (buckler), probably from Old Norse targa (small round shield) (whence also Old English targe, targa (shield)) from Proto-Germanic *targǭ (edge), from Proto-Indo-European *dArg'h- (fenced lot). Akin to Old High German zarga (side wall, rim) (German Zarge (frame)).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

targe f (plural targes)

  1. a targe, buckler

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

NounEdit

targe f (plural targes)

  1. targe