Old NorseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *deyḱ- (to point out), see also Sanskrit देश (deśa, region, province), Proto-Germanic *tīhaną (to point out).[1]

NounEdit

teigr m

  1. a distinct portion or plot of land.

DescendantsEdit

  • Icelandic: teigur
  • Norwegian Bokmål: teig
  • Norwegian Nynorsk: teig
  • Westrobothnian: täjg

ReferencesEdit

  • Leiv Heggstad, Gamalnorsk ordbok med nynorsk tyding (Det Norske Samlaget, 1930)
  1. ^ Pokorny, Julius (1959) Indogermanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch [Indo-European Etymological Dictionary] (in German), Bern, München: Francke Verlag, page 188-89

WelshEdit

 
teigr

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English tiger, from Middle English tygre, in part from Old English tigras pl, in part from Anglo-Norman tigre, both from Latin tigris, from Ancient Greek τίγρις (tígris), from Iranian (compare Avestan 𐬙𐬌𐬔𐬭𐬌(tigri, arrow), 𐬙𐬌𐬖𐬭𐬀(tiγra, pointed)).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /tei̯ɡr/, [ˈtʰei̯ɡr̩]

NounEdit

teigr m (plural teigrod, feminine teigres)

  1. a tiger

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
teigr deigr nheigr theigr
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.