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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French télégraphe.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

 
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telegraph (plural telegraphs)

  1. (historical) An apparatus, or a process, for communicating rapidly between distant points, especially by means of established visible or audible signals representing words or ideas, or by means of words and signs, transmitted by electrical means.
    • 1920, Mary Roberts Rinehart, Avery Hopwood, The Bat, chapterI:
      The Bat—they called him the Bat. []. He [] played a lone hand, []. Most lone wolves had a moll at any rate—women were their ruin—but if the Bat had a moll, not even the grapevine telegraph could locate her.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

telegraph (third-person singular simple present telegraphs, present participle telegraphing, simple past and past participle telegraphed)

  1. To send a message by telegraph
  2. To give nonverbal signals to another, as with gestures or a change in attitude.
    Her frown telegraphed her displeasure.
  3. To show one's intended action unintentionally.

TranslationsEdit