terribly

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From terrible +‎ -ly.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈtɛɹ.ɪ.bli/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: ter‧ri‧bly

AdverbEdit

terribly (comparative more terribly, superlative most terribly)

  1. (literary or dated) So as to cause terror or awe.
    The lion roared terribly.
    • 1959, Anthony Burgess, Beds in the East (The Malayan Trilogy), published 1972, page 519:
      The mere sensuous impact of trumpet or saxophone, whatever it happened to be playing, was an echo, even though a faint echo, of that excitement and abandon. He wanted to taste, smell, hear: his senses were terribly alive.
  2. Very; extremely.
    He's terribly busy and you really shouldn't bother him.
    • 2011 December 15, Felicity Cloake, “How to cook the perfect nut roast”, in Guardian[1]:
      The parsnip, stilton and chestnut combination may taste good, but it's not terribly decorative. In fact, dull's the word, a lingering adjectival ghost of nut roasts past that I'm keen to banish from the table.
  3. Very badly.
    She took part in the karaoke, but sang terribly.

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