Open main menu

EnglishEdit

 
Advertising Poster

EtymologyEdit

From the advertising slogan "For “That Tired Feeling” take Hood's Sarsaparilla", coined by Charles I. Hood (1845-1922). (See citations.)

NounEdit

that tired feeling

  1. An extended lethargy.
    • 1894 October 14, “In Printer's Ink, the Secret”, in The New York Times[1], volume XLIV, page 21:
      His great advertising line, “For That Tired Feeling Take Hood's,” has come into national fame.
    • 1894 May, Frank Kraft, “That Tired Feeling”, in The Medical Advance[2], volume XXXI, number 5, page 293–4:
      ... That Tired Feeling is at the bottom of all distressing complaints and is the bane of our latter-day civilization.
    • 1922, Boyd Fisher, Mental Causes of Accidents[3], Houghton Mifflin Company, page 225:
      He knows that “that tired feeling” may be most acute at the beginning of the spell of work, and wear away as one warms up.