through the roof

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EnglishEdit

Prepositional phraseEdit

through the roof

  1. (idiomatic, figuratively) At a very high level.
    Fuel prices have gone through the roof since last fall.
    Fuel prices are through the roof this winter.
    • 1954, Farm Journal, volume 78, page 18:
      Soybean meal prices have gone through the roof — they're over $100 a ton, back to war-time levels — because of heavy exports and a short 1953 crop.
    • 2011 October 23, Tom Fordyce, “2011 Rugby World Cup final: New Zealand 8-7 France”, in BBC Sport[1]:
      With 16 minutes left on the clock and the tension climbing through the roof, Trinh-Duc tried his luck with a penalty from just inside halfway only to push it wide, but the unthinkable now seemed a real possibility.
    • 2014, Kwame Owusu-Baafi, Through the Eyes of the Spirit[2], page 136:
      His heartbeat increased in intensity, his hormones went through the roof, and his mind became woozy.
    • 2011, Kaleda Carthran, Looking Through the Mirrors of Me: The Life of Kaleda Carthran[3]:
      That computer was high priced, and the interest was through the roof, but we got it!
    • 2012, David Millar, Racing Through the Dark: Crash. Burn. Coming Clean. Coming Back.[4]:
      My numbers were through the roof, and I was beating records held by some of the most successful cyclists.
    • 2015, Linda Newbery, Andie's Moon: The Historical House[5]:
      I looked in some estate agents' today – the prices are through the roof.

TranslationsEdit

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