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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Imitative.

NounEdit

thrum (plural thrums)

  1. A thrumming sound; a hum or vibration.
    • 1955, Elizabeth Bowen, A World of Love, Chapter 2:
      Pungent sweat and heatedly trodden grass, fumes of tea and porter, thrum of hooves from the paddock, the strikings-up and dyings-down of the band all fused into an extreme for Antonia, whose own senses, boatful, stood up to it.
  2. (figuratively) A spicy taste; a tang.
    • 2014 October 25, Jeff Gordinier, “In search of the perfect taco”, in T: The New York Times Style Magazine (international edition)[1], page 100:
      The trailblazing Oaxacan chef Alejandro Ruiz [] has spiked this black-bean sauce with a hidden depth charge of flavor: patches of foliage from a local avocado tree. The leaves electrify the sauce with an unexpected thrum of black licorice.

VerbEdit

thrum (third-person singular simple present thrums, present participle thrumming, simple past and past participle thrummed)

  1. To cause a steady rhythmic vibration, usually by plucking.
    She watched as he thrummed the guitar strings absently.
  2. To make a monotonous drumming noise.
    to thrum on a table
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English thrum, throm (> Anglo-French trome), from Old English *þrum (found in tungeþrum (ligament of the tongue)) from Proto-Germanic *þrumą. Cognate with German Trumm and Old Norse thrǫmr (edge, brim).

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

thrum (plural thrums)

  1. The ends of the warp threads in a loom which remain unwoven attached to the loom when the web is cut.
  2. (chiefly in plural) A fringe made of such threads.
  3. Any short piece of leftover thread or yarn; a tuft or tassel.
  4. (botany) A threadlike part of a flower; a stamen.
  5. (botany) A tuft, bundle, or fringe of any threadlike structures, as hairs on a leaf, fibers of a root.
  6. (anatomy) A bundle of minute blood vessels, a plexus.
  7. (nautical, chiefly in plural) Small pieces of rope yarn used for making mats or mops.
  8. (nautical) A mat made of canvas and tufts of yarn.
  9. (mining) A shove out of place; a small displacement or fault along a seam.
TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

thrum (not comparable)

  1. Made of or woven from thrum.
    • 1768, Laurence Sterne, A Sentimental Journey through France and Italy, "The Husband: Paris"
      In Paris, there are scarce two orders of beings more different: for the legislative and executive powers of the shop not resting in the husband, he seldom comes there:—in some dark and dismal room behind, he sits commerce-less, in his thrum nightcap, the same rough son of Nature that Nature left him.

VerbEdit

thrum (third-person singular simple present thrums, present participle thrumming, simple past and past participle thrummed)

  1. To furnish with thrums; to insert tufts in; to fringe.
    • (Can we date this quote by Quarles and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      are we born to thrum caps or pick straw?
  2. (nautical) To insert short pieces of rope-yarn or spun yarn in.
    to thrum a piece of canvas, or a mat, thus making a rough or tufted surface

AnagramsEdit