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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French timide, from Latin timidus (full of fear, fearful, timid), from timeō (I fear).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /tɪmɪd/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

timid (comparative timider, superlative timidest)

  1. Lacking in courage or confidence.
    Synonyms: fearful, timorous, shy; see also Thesaurus:cautious, Thesaurus:shy
    Antonyms: daredevil, dauntless, bellicose, reckless, aggressive
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 19, in The China Governess[1]:
      When Timothy and Julia hurried up the staircase to the bedroom floor, where a considerable commotion was taking place, Tim took Barry Leach with him. […]. The captive made no resistance and came not only quietly but in a series of eager little rushes like a timid dog on a choke chain.
    John's a very timid person. I'll doubt he'll be brave enough to face his brother.

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IbaloiEdit

NounEdit

timid

  1. (anatomy) chin

IlocanoEdit

NounEdit

timid

  1. (anatomy) chin

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French timide and Latin timidus.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

timid m or n (feminine singular timidă, masculine plural timizi, feminine and neuter plural timide)

  1. timid, shy

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit