See also: tra, trà, trä, trã, trả, and tra-

IrishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Irish tráig (strand, shore, ebb-tide).

PronunciationEdit

Noun 1Edit

trá f (genitive singular trá, nominative plural tránna)

  1. beach, strand, (sandy) seashore
    Synonym: cladach
    1. (beach at) low water
  2. (sailing) foreshore
DeclensionEdit
Alternative formsEdit
Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

trá m (genitive singular trá)

  1. verbal noun of tráigh
  2. ebb
    Ní fhanann trá le fear mall.An ebb does not wait for a slow man.
  3. subsidence, decline
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Irish trá (then, therefore, so, indeed).

PronunciationEdit

Alternative formsEdit

AdverbEdit

trá

  1. (literary) then, indeed; however

ConjunctionEdit

trá

  1. (literary) then, indeed; however

Etymology 3Edit

See treá.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

trá f (genitive singular trá, nominative plural tránna)

  1. Alternative form of treá (spear)
DeclensionEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
trá thrá dtrá
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


Old IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • .t. (abbreviation)

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

trá (never clause-initial)

  1. now, therefore, then
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 7d10
      Do·adbadar sund trá causa pro qua scripta est æpistola .i. irbága ro·batar leosom eter desciplu et debe; óentu immurgu eter a magistru.
      Here, then is shown the reason for which the epistle was written, i.e. they had had contentions and disagreement between the disciples
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 22c10
      Is bés trá dosom aní-siu cosc inna mban i tossug et a tabairt fo chumacte a feir, armbat irlamu de ind ḟir fo chumacte Dǽi, co·mbí íarum coscitir ind ḟir et do·airbertar fo réir Dǽ.
      This, then, is a custom of his, to correct the wives at first and to bring them under the power of their husbands, so that the husbands may be the readier under God’s power, so that afterwards the husbands are corrected and bowed down in subjection to God.
    Synonym: did(i)u

DescendantsEdit

  • Irish: trá

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
trá thrá trá
pronounced with /d(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit