traitor

See also: traïtor

Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French traïtor (French: traître), from Latin traditor.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

traitor ‎(plural traitors)

  1. One who violates his allegiance and betrays his/her country; one guilty of treason; one who, in breach of trust, delivers his country to an enemy, or yields up any fort or place intrusted to his defense, or surrenders an army or body of troops to the enemy, unless when vanquished; also, one who takes arms and levies war against his country; or one who aids an enemy in conquering his country.
  2. Hence, one who betrays any confidence or trust.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

traitor ‎(third-person singular simple present traitors, present participle traitoring, simple past and past participle traitored)

  1. To act the traitor toward; to betray; to deceive.

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

traitor ‎(comparative more traitor, superlative most traitor)

  1. traitorous
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TranslationsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin trāditor.

NounEdit

traitor m ‎(oblique plural traitors, nominative singular traitre, nominative plural traitor)

  1. traitor

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


Old ProvençalEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin traditor.

NounEdit

traitor m ‎(oblique plural traitors, nominative singular traitors, nominative plural traitor)

  1. traitor

ReferencesEdit

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