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See also: trébuchet

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EnglishEdit

 
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trebuchet

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French trebuchet, trebuket et al. (modern trébuchet), from trebuchier (to overthrow, topple), from tre- + *buchier, from Old French buc (trunk of the body), from Old Frankish *būk (belly, trunk, torso), from Proto-Germanic *būkaz (belly, abdomen, trunk), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰōw- (to blow, swell). Cognate with Old High German būh (belly), Old English būc (belly, trunk). More at bouk.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈtɹɛbəʃɛt/, /ˈtɹɛb.jə.ʃeɪ/, /ˈtɹɛb.ju.ʃeɪ/
  • (US) enPR: trěb’yo͞o-shet, IPA(key): /ˈtɹɛb.juˌʃɛt/, /ˈtɹɛb.jəˌʃeɪ/

NounEdit

trebuchet (plural trebuchets)

  1. A medieval siege engine consisting of a large pivoting arm heavily weighted on one end.
    Medieval trebuchets are said to have been capable of launching 90kg projectiles over distances of more than 300 meters, making them more powerful than most pre-modern types of catapult.
  2. A torture device for dunking suspected witches by means of a chair attached to the end of a long pole.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the verb trebuchier.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

trebuchet m (oblique plural trebuchez or trebuchetz, nominative singular trebuchez or trebuchetz, nominative plural trebuchet)

  1. trebuchet, bird trap
  2. fall (instance of falling)
  3. place where a fall occurs
  4. trap; ambush

DescendantsEdit