trek

See also: Trek

Contents

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Afrikaans trek, from Dutch trekken, from Middle Dutch trekken (wk) and trēken (st) ‎(to trek, place, bring, move) from Old Dutch *trekkan, *trekan, from Proto-Germanic *trikaną, *trakjaną ‎(to drag, scrape, pull), from Proto-Indo-European *dreg- ‎(to drag, scrape).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

trek ‎(plural treks)

  1. A slow or difficult journey.
    We're planning on going on a trek up Kilimanjaro.
  2. (South Africa) A journey by ox wagon.
  3. (South Africa) The Boer migration of 1835-1837.

VerbEdit

trek ‎(third-person singular simple present treks, present participle trekking, simple past and past participle trekked)

  1. (intransitive) To make a slow or arduous journey.
  2. (intransitive) To journey on foot, especially to hike through mountainous areas.
  3. (South Africa) To travel by ox wagon.

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

AfrikaansEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Dutch trekken.

VerbEdit

trek ‎(present trek, present participle trekkende, past participle getrek)

  1. to haul
  2. to move (moving house)
  3. to pull

Etymology 2Edit

From Dutch trek.

NounEdit

trek ‎(plural [please provide])

  1. journey
Derived termsEdit

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch trec, from trecken.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

trek c ‎(uncountable, diminutive trekje n)

  1. appetite
    Ik heb trek in een reep chocola — I could (now) have a chocolate bar
    Ik heb geen trek in deze klus — I have no mind to carry out this task
  2. journey, migration
  3. draught, air current through a chimney.

VerbEdit

trek

  1. first-person singular present indicative of trekken
  2. imperative of trekken

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

NounEdit

trek m ‎(plural treks)

  1. treck
  2. trecking
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