CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan [Term?] (compare the variant trichar, Occitan trigar), from Late Latin trīcāre (compare French tricher (to cheat), regional Italian treccare), from Latin trīcārī, present active infinitive of trīcor (make difficult ties, trifle, dally, play tricks, behave in an evasive manner), from trīcae.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

trigar (first-person singular present trigo, past participle trigat)

  1. (intransitive) to take a long time, to be long
  2. (intransitive) to be late
  3. (transitive) to take (a certain amount of time)

Usage notesEdit

The main difference between trigar and durar when used transitively is that the former signifies some event that one has to wait for, while the latter signifies an ongoing action.

ConjugationEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • “trigar” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Suevic *þrīhanan or Gothic 𐌸𐍂𐌴𐌹𐌷𐌰𐌽 (þreihan), from Proto-Germanic *þrenhanan (urge)

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

trigar (first-person singular present trigo, first-person singular preterite triguei, past participle trigado)

  1. (intransitive) to hurry; to hasten; to rush; to speed up
    Synonym: bulir

ConjugationEdit


ReferencesEdit

  • trigar” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.

OccitanEdit

VerbEdit

trigar

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

ConjugationEdit