trocken

GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German trucken, trocken, from Old High German truckan, trokkan (dried out, parched, thirsty, dry), from Proto-Germanic *druknaz, *druhnaz (dry), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰerǵʰ- (to strengthen; become hard or solid), from *dʰer- (to hold, hold fast, support). The form trucken was originally predominant, but the word eventually became standardized in an old western variant with -o-. Cognate with Old Saxon drokno (dry, adverb), Old English ġedrycnan (to dry up).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈtʁɔkən/, [ˈtʁɔkən], [ˈtʁɔkŋ̩]
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

trocken (strong nominative masculine singular trockener, comparative trockener, superlative am trockensten)

  1. dry (not wet; lacking water)
    Antonyms: feucht, nass
    Ein Bier, bitte, meine Kehle ist ganz trocken.
    A beer, please, my throat is really dry.
  2. (wine) dry (not sweet)
    Antonyms: lieblich, halbtrocken
  3. (person) dry (abstinent after having had an alcohol problem)
  4. (joke) dry (subtly humorous, and often mildly rude)
  5. dry (dull, boring)

DeclensionEdit

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Further readingEdit