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CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan [Term?] (compare Occitan tronar), from Latin tonāre, present active infinitive of tonō (compare French tonner, Spanish tronar, Portuguese troar, Italian tuonare), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *(s)tenh₂- (to thunder). The extra -r- is due to influence from Latin tonitrus (Vulgar Latin *tronitus).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

tronar (first-person singular present trono, past participle tronat)

  1. to thunder

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


OccitanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan [Term?], from Latin tonāre, present active infinitive of tonō, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *(s)tenh₂- (to thunder). Compare Catalan tronar, French tonner. The extra -r- is due to influence from Latin tonitrus (Vulgar Latin *tronitus).

VerbEdit

tronar

  1. to thunder

ConjugationEdit

This verb needs an inflection-table template.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Spanish [Term?], from Latin tonāre, present active infinitive of tonō (with an -r- due to influence from tronido or Latin tonitrus, Vulgar Latin *tronitus), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *(s)tenh₂- (to thunder). Compare Portuguese troar, French tonner.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /tɾoˈnaɾ/, [t̪ɾoˈnaɾ]

VerbEdit

tronar (first-person singular present trueno, first-person singular preterite troné, past participle tronado)

  1. (intransitive, impersonal) to thunder
  2. (transitive, colloquial) to bust, ruin (person)
    Synonym: arruinar
  3. (intransitive, colloquial) to fail (not pass an exam)
    Synonyms: fracasar, suspender
  4. (colloquial, of a body part) to crack (to make a cracking sound)

ConjugationEdit

  • Rule: o becomes a ue in stressed syllables.

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


SwedishEdit

VerbEdit

tronar

  1. present tense of trona.