EnglishEdit

AdverbEdit

turbulently ‎(comparative more turbulently, superlative most turbulently)

  1. In a turbulent manner.
    • 1887, Thomas Hardy, The Woodlanders, Chapter 29,[1]
      And she had turbulently admitted to his wringing questions that her visit to Middleton had been undertaken less because of the invalid relative than in shamefaced fear of her own weakness if she remained near his home.
    • 1934, H. G. Wells, Experiment in Autobiography, Chapter I, section 4,[2]
      The Hoptons, the greengrocer’s family over the way, were “rough” she thought; they were really turbulently jolly []
    • 1969, “The Muddied Mekong,” Time, 26 December, 1969,[3]
      The 2,600-mile Mekong, the world's eleventh longest river and one of the least used, rises in the Himalayan plateau of China near Tibet, plunges turbulently through the mountain gorges of Yunnan, and emerges to divide and water the Indo-Chinese peninsula.
    • 1988, Edmund White, The Beautiful Room is Empty, New York: Vintage International, 1994, Chapter Four,
      The shiny, very dark, and turbulently ornate woodwork []