See also: Tweed

EnglishEdit

 
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Tweed
Tweed jacket

EtymologyEdit

Attested since the 1830s. Probably a shortening or back-formation from Scots tweedling (a type of twilled cloth),[1][2] attested since the 16th century and related to tweedle; the two words are variants of tweeling and tweel, which go back to Middle English twel, twyle (a type of woven fabric; twill), whence also English twill.[3] Scottish tradition says it derives directly from tweel when an English merchant misread tweels or tweeled (cloth) in an 1831 letter from a Scottish merchant as Tweed(s) and took it to be a trade-name based on the River Tweed,[4][5] but the DSL says evidence for this is lacking, and because English merchants must have been familiar with tweel(ed cloth) before the 1830s, it seems unlikely to be based on misunderstanding tweel rather than on the well-attested tweedle.[4] Several of the earliest citations, from 1839,[6] 1841, and 1845 treat it as a new name for a familiar cloth.[4]

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /twiːd/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iːd

NounEdit

tweed (countable and uncountable, plural tweeds)

  1. A coarse woolen fabric used for clothing.
    • 1839, Great Britain. Central Criminal Court, Central Criminal Court. Minutes of Evidence, page 75:
      MICHAEL NOWAK, alias John Mazurkiewiez, was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April, 2 1/4 yards of woollen cloth, called tweed, value 12s., and 2 1/4 yards of woollen cloth, called doe-skin, value 17s., []
    • 1928, Lawrence R. Bourne, chapter 13, in Well Tackled![1]:
      “Nothing very special, sir. He had a mack or coat over his arm, and a trilby hat. He wore a tweed suit, sir, I think.”

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ tweed”, in Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary
  2. ^ tweed”, in Dictionary.com Unabridged, Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995–present.
  3. ^ tweedling” in the Dictionary of the Scots Language, Edinburgh: Scottish Language Dictionaries., “tweedle” in the Dictionary of the Scots Language, Edinburgh: Scottish Language Dictionaries., “tweel” in the Dictionary of the Scots Language, Edinburgh: Scottish Language Dictionaries.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 tweed” in the Dictionary of the Scots Language, Edinburgh: Scottish Language Dictionaries.
  5. ^ tweed”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–2022.
  6. ^ Douglas Harper (2001–2022), “tweed”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

AnagramsEdit


FinnishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Unadapted borrowing from English tweed.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈtʋiːdi/, [ˈt̪ʋiːdi]

NounEdit

tweed

  1. tweed (fabric)

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of tweed (Kotus type 5/risti, no gradation)
nominative tweed tweedit
genitive tweedin tweedien
partitive tweediä tweedejä
illative tweediin tweedeihin
singular plural
nominative tweed tweedit
accusative nom. tweed tweedit
gen. tweedin
genitive tweedin tweedien
partitive tweediä tweedejä
inessive tweedissä tweedeissä
elative tweedistä tweedeistä
illative tweediin tweedeihin
adessive tweedillä tweedeillä
ablative tweediltä tweedeiltä
allative tweedille tweedeille
essive tweedinä tweedeinä
translative tweediksi tweedeiksi
instructive tweedein
abessive tweedittä tweedeittä
comitative tweedeineen
Possessive forms of tweed (type risti)
possessor singular plural
1st person tweedini tweedimme
2nd person tweedisi tweedinne
3rd person tweedinsä

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tweed m (uncountable)

  1. tweed

Further readingEdit


PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

tweed m (uncountable)

  1. tweed (coarse woolen fabric)

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English tweed.

NounEdit

tweed n (plural tweeduri)

  1. tweed

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English tweed.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈtwid/, [ˈt̪wið̞]

NounEdit

tweed m (uncountable)

  1. tweed

Further readingEdit