EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): [ɯx], [ɯχ], [ɯʀ̊], [ɯɣ], [əx], [əχ], [əɣ], [ʌx], [ʌχ], [ʌɡ], [ʌk], [ʌʀ̊], [ʊx], [ʊχ], [ʊk], [ʊʀ̊], [ʊ], [ʌ᷈]
  • (file)
    ,
    (file)
    ,
    (file)

Note: may be nasalized.

InterjectionEdit

ugh

  1. Used to express repugnance, disgust, or annoyance.
    Ugh! The bread in the pantry has gone moldy.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:yuck
  2. Used to express inarticulate vocalisations, such as used by a caveman.
    • 1921, H.G. Wells, “The Grisly Folk”, in Selected Short Stories, published 1958, page 291:
      The brothers surveyed the wide prospect earnestly. "Ugh!" said one abruptly and pointed. "Ugh!" cried his brother. The eyes of the whole tribe swung round to the pointing finger. The group became one rigid stare.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


ManxEdit

InterjectionEdit

ugh!

  1. oh!

Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish og, from Proto-Celtic *āuyom, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ōwyóm.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ugh m (genitive singular uigh or uighe, plural uighean)

  1. egg

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
ugh n-ugh h-ugh t-ugh
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  • Edward Dwelly (1911), “ugh”, in Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan [The Illustrated Gaelic–English Dictionary], 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, →ISBN
  • G. Toner, M. Ní Mhaonaigh, S. Arbuthnot, D. Wodtko, M.-L. Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “og”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language