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See also: Uke, ūke, and Üke

Contents

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From ukulele (small four-string guitar) by shortening.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

uke (plural ukes)

  1. (informal) Ukulele.

Etymology 2Edit

From Japanese 受ける (ukeru, to receive, to get).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

uke (plural ukes or uke)

  1. (judo, martial arts) The training partner against whom tori performs a move.
  2. (Japanese fiction) A passive or submissive male fictional character in a same-sex relationship; a bottom.
    • 2008, Tan Bee Kee, "Rewriting Gender and Sexuality in English-Language Yaoi Fanfiction", in Boys' Love Manga: Essays on the Sexual Ambiguity and Cross-Cultural Fandom of the Genre (eds. Antonia Levi, Mark McHarry & Dru Pagliassotti), McFarland & Company (2008), ISBN 9780786441952, page 142:
      Yaoi uke in fanfics often bear the brunt of stereotypical "negative female characteristics" such as passivity, helplessness, and masochism.
    • 2010, Pentabu, My Girlfriend's a Geek, Volume 1, Yen Press (2012), ISBN 9780316221801, unnumbered page:
      You'd rather have Sebas be an uke?
    • 2010, Kyoka Wakatsuki, "Afterword", in The Selfish Demon King, Digital Manga Publishing (2010), ISBN 9781569701324, unnumbered page:
      Shizuku is so, so, so cute! I love him as an uke so much I can't stand it!
    • For more examples of usage of this term, see Citations:uke.
AntonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

uke

  1. Rōmaji transcription of うけ

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse vika, from Proto-Germanic *wikǭ, from Proto-Indo-European *weig-, *weik- (to bend, wind, turn, yield).

NounEdit

uke f, m (definite singular uka or uken, indefinite plural uker, definite plural ukene)

  1. a week

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit