See also: ulcerá, ulcéra, and úlcera

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ulcera, plural of ulcus.

NounEdit

ulcera

  1. plural of ulcus
    • 1916, Ophthalmology: Essays, Abstracts and Reviews, volume 12, page 150:
      He also likes the vapor-cauterization of Wesseli (100° C.), which does not produce an action at a distance. It also helps for deep scrophulous ulcera.
    • 1918, Heliodor Schiller, “An Unusual Ulcerative Process of the Vulva”, in The American Journal of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children, volume 77, page 398:
      The pathogenesis of the veneric ulcerations or soft chancre, or the syphilitic ulcera, the diphtheritic, the tubercular, the rare gonorrhoic ulcerations and of the phagedenic or gangrenous ulcerations of the vulva, is well known.
    • 1923, Acta Chirurgica Scandinavica, volume 55, page 116:
      The farthing-sized ulcera and the 2 sixpence-sized ones were, clinically and anatomically, like the fresh ulcers, which Dieulafoy gave the name of ‘exulceratio simplex’.
    • 1928, Far Eastern Association of Tropical Medicine, Transactions of the Seventh Congress Held in British India, December 1927, pages 374, 378, 380:
      I had occasion to observe four cases of rather fresh ulcera of the vulva, two of them by the amiability of Dr. Sutomo, Chief of the Dermatological Department at the C. B. Z. in Soerabaya. [] But in those advanced cases, the differences are blotted out, a cicatrical tissue, the origin of which cannot be guessed, appears and the ulcera show a rather unspecific character. [] De Vrieze put the question, if it could not be perhaps the Plaut-Vincent-infection of phagedænical ulcera and if there had been already made the relative researches, upon which question Roegholt gave a negative answer.
    • 1948, The Netherlands Red Cross Feeding Team: Report on Nutritional Survey in the Netherlands East Indies Conducted During October 1945 Till June 1946, “Ulcus tropicum”, page 89:
      Although no doubt the atonic character of the tropical ulcer, as well as the aspect and the course show much resemblance with the properties of ulcera, observed in the Netherlands in cases of serious underfeeding, experience shows, that well fed persons also may get typical tropical ulcers.
    • 1954, Jules Samuels, Endogenous Endocrinotherapy, Including the Causal Cure of Cancer: Compendium, Amsterdam: N.V. Cycloscoop, page 316:
      By the observations and experiments of numbers of clinicians and investigators it has become certain now that the central brain, particularly the hypothalamus, is of great importance for the origin of erosions and ulcera of the stomach.
    • 1957, Experimental Medicine and Surgery, New York: Brooklyn Medical Press, page 163:
      V. E., .born 1920 (File Nr. 27, 26 October to 8 January 1954). Gastrectomy in March 1953 because of multiple ulcera of the stomach.
    • 1988, Peter Langer, The Mammalian Herbivore Stomach: Comparative Anatomy, Function, and Evolution, Gustav Fischer Verlag, →ISBN, page 408:
      More than 80% of all ulcera of the stomach in humans can be found along the lesser curvature (Haftner, 1965; Kommerell & Reiferscheid, 1979) and HCI and pepsin are supposed to be related to the aetiology of the ulcera.

ItalianEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Latin ulcus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ulcera f (plural ulcere)

  1. (pathology) ulcer, sore

Related termsEdit

VerbEdit

ulcera

  1. inflection of ulcerare:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

NounEdit

ulcera

  1. nominative/accusative/vocative plural of ulcus

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French ulcérer.

VerbEdit

a ulcera (third-person singular present ulcerează, past participle ulcerat1st conj.

  1. to ulcerate

ConjugationEdit


SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

ulcera

  1. inflection of ulcerar:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative