English

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Etymology

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un- +‎ earth

Pronunciation

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Verb

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unearth (third-person singular simple present unearths, present participle unearthing, simple past and past participle unearthed)

  1. To drive or draw from the earth.
    to unearth a fox or a badger
  2. To uncover or find; to bring out from concealment
    Synonyms: bring to light, disclose, unfold
    to unearth a secret
  3. To dig up.
    • 1971, R. C. Majumdar, “Medicine”, in A Concise History of Science in India[1], New Delhi: Indian National Science Academy, published 1989, →OCLC, page 261:
      Modern archaeological excavations have unearthed the remains of a large number of ancient cities that lay buried deep under the sands for more than a thousand years, along the trade route from Bactria to China passing between the Tien Shan mountains in the north and the desert of Taklamakan in the south.
    • 2008, BioWare, Mass Effect, Redwood City: Electronic Arts, →ISBN, →OCLC, PC, scene: Protheans: Data Discs Codex entry:
      Despite all the evidence confirming the existence of the Protheans, little is known about their culture and society. From time to time, dig sites will yield new clues, but after 50,000 years of decay, little of value is unearthed.
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:unearth.

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