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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From un- +‎ exist.

VerbEdit

unexist (third-person singular simple present unexists, present participle unexisting, simple past and past participle unexisted)

  1. (intransitive) To not exist, or to cease to exist.
    • 2017, Gaston Vilaire, The Eve of Paramour (→ISBN):
      They too are as lost and fragmented as their makers. Uprooted caravans crossing the arid countryside, cascading barren slopes, gracefully balancing on their heads the remnants of their ecology packed in gray burlap sacks of charcoal, for black is the charcoal and white the countryside where lush tropical greens long unexist. Bare land with its fertile soil at the bottom of the ocean. People spill into the ocean and become fish, where tropical fish long unexist and only the sharks dwell.
  2. (transitive) To cause (someone or something) to not exist.
    • 1990, Linda Hartinian, Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said: Based Upon the Novel by Philip K. Dick (→ISBN), page 25:
      A man who's unexisted himself.
    • 2011, Franklin E. Morgan, Time Delay (→ISBN), page 70:
      Unpopularity had been the outcome of stardom. The latter became a more pronounced phenomenon after Ms. Holly disappearance from existence. With Ms. Holly unexisted, I was terrified. Who could I trust? Well, no one or else they may go the way of Ms. Holly.
    • 2014, Amy Alkon, Good Manners for Nice People Who Sometimes Say F*ck (→ISBN), page 107:
      If, however, some Facebook friend is just dull or mildly disagreeable, I go back to my guiding principle—openness and inclusiveness—remembering how it felt to be the kid who always got shunned by schoolmates who would have unexisted me if they could.