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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin ungulātus, from Latin ungula (hoof).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈʌŋɡjələt/, /ˈʌŋɡjəleɪt/

AdjectiveEdit

ungulate (not generally comparable, comparative more ungulate, superlative most ungulate)

  1. Having hooves.
    • 1866, Andrew Murray, The geographical distribution of mammals, page 242:
      When Owen wrote his description there was no evidence to determine the character of the extremities, whether they were ungulate, unguiculate, or pinnate, while the structure of the nostrils suggested
    • 1893, in The American naturalist, volume 27, page 126 [1]:
      Unlike the serial manus and pes of the edentata the carpus and tarsus are here diplarthrous in structure or displaced upon each other. While the Condylarthra are ungulate with an unguiculate carpus and tarsus, []
    • 2012, Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Collected John Carter of Mars, volume 3:
      Like nearly all the land animals of Jupiter, as I was to learn later, they were ungulate, hoofs evidently being rendered necessary by the considerable areas of hardened lava on the surface of the planet, []
  2. Shaped like a hoof.
    • 1922, in Indiana University studies, volume 9, page 68 [2]:
      [] areolet of only moderate size; first abscissa of the radius slightly more ungulate than in other varieties.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

ungulate (plural ungulates)

  1. An ungulate animal; a hooved mammal.
    The majority of large land mammals are ungulates.
TranslationsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ungulate

  1. feminine plural of ungulato

LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ungulāte

  1. vocative masculine singular of ungulātus