ventilate

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English, borrowed from Latin ventilātus, past participle of ventilō.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

VerbEdit

ventilate (third-person singular simple present ventilates, present participle ventilating, simple past and past participle ventilated)

  1. To replace stale or noxious air with fresh.
  2. To circulate air through a building, etc.
  3. To provide with a vent.
  4. To expose something to the circulation of fresh air.
  5. To expose something to public examination or discussion.
    • 1926, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The Land of Mist[1]:
      "Well, I did my best. I had no hopes, and it has worked out as I thought. It is a pure waste of time." "Not at all," Malone answered. "It has ventilated an evil. There were reporters in court. Surely some of them have some sense. They will note the injustice."
    • 1964 September, “News: Yeovil Junction not to be closed”, in Modern Railways, page 202:
      The WR has dropped its plan to close Yeovil Junction station. As we predicted on page 376 of the June issue, there has been strong opposition to the suggestion and on July 10 local opinion ventilated its case at a Yeovil Town Hall meeting attended by Mr. G. F. Fiennes, General Manager of the WR.
  6. (medicine) To provide manual or mechanical breathing to a patient.
  7. (slang) To shoot with a firearm; to pierce with bullets.
    • 2010, Michael Miller, Deep Nights:
      If we went in and there was no burglar, and we got into a shooting with the homeowner and ventilated him, that would be a little difficult to explain.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ventilate

  1. feminine plural of ventilato

VerbEdit

ventilate

  1. second-person plural present indicative of ventilare
  2. second-person plural imperative of ventilare
  3. feminine plural of ventilato

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

VerbEdit

ventilāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of ventilō