See also: Vernal

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

PIE word
*wósr̥
 
Japanese cherry trees (Prunus serrulata) in the grounds of Kenchō-ji (the Kenchō Temple) in Kamakura, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan. The blooming of cherry blossoms heralds the vernal season (sense 1) or spring in Japan.

From Latin vernālis ((rare) of or pertaining to spring; vernal), from vērnus (of or pertaining to spring; vernal) + -ālis (suffix forming adjectives of relationship). Vērnus is derived from vēr (season of spring) (ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *wósr̥ (spring)) + -nus (suffix forming adjectives). The English word is cognate with Old French vernal (modern French vernal), Italian vernale (pertaining to spring; vernal), Occitan vernal, Portuguese vernal (pertaining to spring; vernal), Spanish vernal (pertaining to spring; vernal).[1]

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

vernal (comparative more vernal, superlative most vernal) (formal, literary)

  1. Pertaining to or occurring in spring. [from mid 16th c.]
    Synonyms: springlike, spring-like; springly (rare)
    • 1633, Thomas Bancroft, The Glvttons Feauer, London: Printed by Iohn Norton, for William Cooke, [], OCLC 55196806; quoted in “Bancroft, (Thomas.)—The Glvttons Feauer. [] 1633.”, in Thomas Corser, editor, Collectanea Anglo-Poetica: Or, A Bibliographical and Descriptive Catalogue of a Portion of a Collection of Early English Poetry, [] (Remains Historical & Literary Connected with the Palatine Counties of Lancaster and Chester; LII), part I, [Manchester]: Printed for the Chetham Society, 1860, OCLC 644357970, page 139:
      For as a vernall Larke, but lately drest / In her first Downe, abandoning her nest, / Stretchest her pinions, her small force assayes / Flutters, and fals before her flight shee raise, [...]
    • 1640, Ovid, “The Fifth Book; Or, May”, in John Gower, transl.; Edward Alliston, editor, Ovids Festivalls, or Romaine Calendar, Translated into English Verse Equinumerally, [Cambridge, Cambridgeshire]: Printed by Roger Daniel, printer to the University of Cambridge; [a]nd are to be sold by M[ichael] S[parke] junior, [], OCLC 1086945898, page 107:
      To my requeſt this anſwer ſhe bequeath'd, / Whiles from her lips the vernall Roſes breath'd; [...]
    • 1671, R[alph] Bohun, “[Of the Etesian, or Anniversary VVinds: Their Several Species]”, in A Discourse Concerning the Origine and Properties of VVind. [], Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed by W. Hall for Tho[mas] Bowman, OCLC 1029696124, pages 118–119:
      [...] I have in England for ſome years paſt, kept by me an exact table, or Ephemeris both of the Vernall, and Summer Eteſians; but found the VVinds no leſſe Variable in thoſe Months, then at other Seaſons.
    • 1794, Robert Southey, Wat Tyler. A Dramatic Poem. In Three Acts, London: Printed [by J. M‘Creery] for Sherwood, Neely, and Jones, [], published 1817, OCLC 362102, Act I, page 15:
      Look round: the vernal fields smile with new flowers, / The budding orchard perfumes the soft breeze, / And the green corn waves to the passing gale.
    • 1807, “APHIS”, in The Complete Farmer; or, General Dictionary of Agriculture and Husbandry: [], volume I, 5th re-written and enlarged edition, London: Printed by Rider and Weed, []; for R. Baldwin; [et al.], OCLC 38951215, column 1:
      Their [aphids'] punctures of the leaves of peach and nectarine trees in the vernal months; and of cherry, plum, and currant-trees in the summer, produce a swelling and elevation of the cuticle of the leaf on its upper side, and consequent curling of it with its upper surface outwards, which terminates in a destruction of it, [...]
    • 1952, Norman Lewis, Golden Earth: Travels in Burma, London: Jonathan Cape, OCLC 2152583; republished London: Readers Union; Jonathan Cape, 1954, OCLC 2098190, page 120:
      On we went in this way, mile after mile, over hills and through valleys inundated with a frothing, vernal vegetation and filled with the odour of newly watered ferns in a glasshouse.
    • 2015, Brian A. Pavlac, “Liberation of Mind and Body: Early Modern Europe, 1543 to 1815”, in A Concise Survey of Western Civilization: Supremacies and Diversities throughout History, volume 2 (1500 to the Present), 2nd edition, Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield, →ISBN, page 223:
      A religious problem unexpectedly triggered the invention of modern science. [...] According to the Julian calendar, the first day of spring (the vernal equinox, when the hours of day exactly equaled those of night) should occur around 21 March. By the fifteenth century, the vernal equinox fell in early April. The church feared that this delay jeopardized the sanctity of Easter (which was celebrated on the first Sunday after the first full moon following the vernal equinox). The Counter-Reformation papacy, eager to have its structures improved and reformed, called on intellectuals to come up with both an explanation about the Julian calendar's errors and a solution.
  2. (figurative) Having characteristics like spring; fresh, young, youthful.

Usage notesEdit

Vernal is used mostly in technical contexts (as in e.g. vernal equinox) or poetic contexts. In everyday language, attributive use of spring predominates, as in spring colors, spring flowers, spring equinox.

Alternative formsEdit

Coordinate termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


PortugueseEdit

AdjectiveEdit

vernal m or f (plural vernais, comparable)

  1. vernal (pertaining to spring)

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin vernālis.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

vernal (plural vernales)

  1. vernal (pertaining to spring)
    Synonym: primaveral

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit