See also: Wark, wārk-, and wärk-

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English werk, warch, from Old English wærc, wræc ‎(pain, suffering, anguish), from Proto-Germanic *warkiz ‎(pain), from Proto-Indo-European *werǵ-, *wreǵ- ‎(to work, act). Cognate with Swedish värk ‎(ache, pain), Icelandic verkur ‎(pain). Related to work.

NounEdit

wark ‎(plural warks)

  1. (Britain dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) Pain; ache.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English werken, warchen, from Old English wærcan ‎(to be in pain). Cognate with Swedish värka ‎(to ache, pain), Icelandic verkja ‎(to pain). See above.

VerbEdit

wark ‎(third-person singular simple present warks, present participle warking, simple past and past participle warked)

  1. (intransitive) To be in pain; ache.

Etymology 3Edit

See work.

NounEdit

wark ‎(plural warks)

  1. (obsolete, chiefly Scotland) A building.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Spenser to this entry?)

KashubianEdit

NounEdit

wark m

  1. business
  2. profession

ScotsEdit

NounEdit

wark ‎(plural warks)

  1. work
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