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See also: Wark, wārk-, and wärk-

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English werk, warch, from Old English wærc, wræc (pain, suffering, anguish), from Proto-Germanic *warkiz (pain), from Proto-Indo-European *werg- (to suffer), *werǵ- (to make), *wreǵ- (to work, act). Cognate with Swedish värk (ache, pain), Icelandic verkur (pain). Related to work.

NounEdit

wark (plural warks)

  1. (Britain dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) Pain; ache.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English werken, warchen, from Old English wærcan (to be in pain). Cognate with Swedish värka (to ache, pain), Icelandic verkja (to pain). See above.

VerbEdit

wark (third-person singular simple present warks, present participle warking, simple past and past participle warked)

  1. (intransitive) To be in pain; ache.

Etymology 3Edit

See work.

NounEdit

wark (plural warks)

  1. (obsolete, chiefly Scotland) A building.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Spenser to this entry?)

KashubianEdit

NounEdit

wark m

  1. business
  2. profession

Northeast PashayiEdit

NounEdit

wark

  1. water

Further readingEdit

  • Robert Leech, Vocabularies of seven languages, spoken in the countries west of the Indus; also Epitome of the Grammars of the Brahuiky, Balochky & Panjabi Languages (1843)

ScotsEdit

NounEdit

wark (plural warks)

  1. work